Greece

 

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People love Greece for the scenery, history, culture, architecture, food, music, nightlife, beaches, weather….in short, everything! Over 80% of the visitors to Greece are from other European countries.  Below are some photos and quotes by famous Greeks~

Greece rock in the island Zakinfa

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“By all means, get married: if you find a good wife, you’ll be happy; if not, you’ll become a philosopher.” ~ Socrates

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“And there they ring the walls, the young, the lithe. The handsome hold the graves they won in Troy; the enemy earth rides over those who conquered.” Aeschylus, Agamemnon

Agios Nikolao

Agios Nikolao

“We must free ourselves of the hope that the sea will ever rest. We must learn to sail in high winds.” ~ Aristotle Onassis.

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“For thousands of years humans were oppressed— as some of us still are— by the notion that the universe is a marionette whose strings are pulled by a god or gods, unseen and inscrutable. Then 2,500 years ago, there was a glorious awakening in Ionia: on Samos and the other nearby Greek colonies that grew up among the islands and inlets of the busy eastern Aegean Sea.* Suddenly there were people who believed that everything was made of atoms; that human beings and other animals had sprung from simpler forms; that diseases were not caused by demons or the gods; that the Earth was only a planet going around the Sun. And that the stars were very far away.” Carl Sagan, Cosmos

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“Since we cannot change reality, let us change the eyes which see reality.”   Nikos Kazantzakis

Rhodes Island - The white town Lindos - Greece

Rhodes Island – The white town Lindos – Greece

“You’ll come to learn a great deal if you study the Insignificant in depth.” Odysseus Elytis, Poet of the 20th century

melissani-cave-greece

melissani cave

From “My Big Fat Greek Wedding”

Ian Miller: What do you do for Christmas with your family?

Toula: Uh, my mom makes roast lamb.

Ian: Mmm… with mint jelly?

Toula: No.

[pause]

Ian: And…?

Toula: And…

[pause]

Toula: I’m Greek, right?

Ian: Right?

Toula: So, what happens is my dad and uncles, they fight over who gets to eat the lamb brain. And then my aunt Voula forks the eyeball and chases me around with it, try to get me to eat it, ’cause it’s gonna make me smart. So, you have two cousins, I have 27 first cousins. Just 27 first cousins alone! And my whole family is big and loud. And everybody is in each other’s lives and business. All the time! Like, you never just have a minute alone, just to think, ‘Cause we’re always together, just eating, eating, eating! The only other people we know are Greeks, ’cause Greeks marry Greeks to breed more Greeks, to be loud breeding Greek eaters.

Ian: Wow.

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“You don’t develop courage by being happy in your relationships everyday. You develop it by surviving difficult times and challenging adversity.” ~ Epicurus

Athens 1

“The ancient Oracle said that I am the wisest of all the Greeks. It is because I alone, of all the Greeks, know that I know nothing.” Socrates

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“Happy is the man, I thought, who, before dying, has the good fortune to sail the Aegean sea.”  Nikos Kazantzakis, Zorba the Greek

Greece-Acropolis-at-night

“I want to see the Parthenon by moonlight.’
I had my way. They floodlight it now, to great advantage I am told, but it was not so then, and since it was late in the year there were few tourists. My companions were all intelligent men, including my own husband, and they had the sense to stay mute. I suppose, being a woman, I confuse beauty with sentiment, but, as I looked on the Parthenon for the first time in my life, I found myself crying. It had never happened to me before. Your sunset weepers I despise. It was not full moon, or anywhere near it. The half circle put me in mind of the labrys, the Cretan double axe, and the pillars were the most ghostly in consequence. What a shock for the modern aesthete, I thought when my crying was done, if he could see the ruddy glow of colour, the painted eyes, the garish lips, the orange-reds and blues that were there once, and Athene herself a giantess on her pedestal touched by the rising sun. Even in those distant times the exigencies of a state religion had brought their own traffic, the buying and selling of doves, of trinkets: to find himself, a man had to go to the woods, to the hills.
“Come on,” said Stephen. “It’s beautiful and stark, if you like, but so is St. Pancras station at 4 A.M. It depends on your association of ideas.” We crammed into Burns’s small car, and went back to our hotel.~ Daphne Du Maurier, The Chamois

rhodes-greece

rhodes-greece

“The late 1920s were an age of islands, real and metaphorical. They were an age when Americans by thousands and tens of thousands were scheming to take the next boat for the South Seas or the West Indies, or better still for Paris, from which they could scatter to Majorca, Corsica, Capri or the isles of Greece. Paris itself was a modern city that seemed islanded in the past, and there were island countries, like Mexico, where Americans could feel that they had escaped from everything that oppressed them in a business civilization. Or without leaving home they could build themselves private islands of art or philosophy; or else – and this was a frequent solution – they could create social islands in the shadow of the skyscrapers, groups of close friends among whom they could live as unconstrainedly as in a Polynesian valley, live without moral scruples or modern conveniences, live in the pure moment, live gaily on gin and love and two lamb chops broiled over a coal fire in the grate. That was part of the Greenwich Village idea, and soon it was being copied in Boston, San Francisco, everywhere.”
― Malcolm Cowley, Exile’s Return: A Literary Odyssey of the 1920s

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Santorini

“…There is the heat of Love, the pulsing rush of Longing, the lover’s whisper, irresistible—magic to make the sanest man go mad.”
Homer, The Iliad

crete-greece-sitia

crete-greece-sitia

Visas are not required by holders of valid passports from the United States or Canada  if you want to visit Greece and remain in the country for up to 3 months (90 days) within a chronological period of 6 months.

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